Books

So I forgot to bring my current books home for the weekend, which means I’m getting behind in reviews. I was also rather upset at not having my reading material at home.

Marsee must have seen the future though, when lo and behold, a copy of the new “Intermediate Perl”:http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/intermediateperl/ was there waiting for me. Got a good start on that, but now I’m reading three books at once… d’oh.

Hopefully will have some fun reviews soon.

Aquisitions

Well, “my company”:http://finance.yahoo.com/q?s=UNTD went out and “bought a new one”:http://biz.yahoo.com/pz/060320/95888.html . In my position I can’t exactly comment a whole lot about them or direction (please forward all inquiries to … ) but it is nice to see us moving forward and growing our accounts. Looks like we have some fun work ahead of us as they will directly integrate into our operations. Seems to be FreeBSD/Perl 🙂 At least that makes things easy.

SQL::Preproc

Forgot to post this a while back. Darn “Dan Hanks”:http://www.brainshed.com gave me this module to look at. He and I regularly exchange cool stuff, but this one really has me thinking. “SQL::Preproc”:http://search.cpan.org/~darnold/SQL-Preproc-0.10/Preproc.pod is a source filter that creates new SQL language elements in Perl.

I’m really impressed by the look of the code with SQL as a native element. I know this is something you’d be able to do pretty easier in certain languages, and especially in Perl6, but in Perl5 it kind of scares me. When it comes to source filters, I had “a bad experience” with one once. Using a source filter does place some annoying constraints on the code as listed in the Supported syntax code, which one can live with easily, but can be handled nicer in something like Perl6.

From my rather casual review so far, they do seem to have decent constructs for the various forms of fetching data via the “DBI”:http://search.cpan.org/perldoc?DBI , which was a concern for me, as I use several different methods often in order to do various performance tuning operations, or to just fit in certain paradigms.

I haven’t had a task to play with this in a real situation yet, but it does pique the old curiosity, as I think bringing the concept of db access internal could be very nice in certain instances.

Online Freedom of Speech

Nice little writeup about a new bill by Senator Bill Frist, “Online Freedom of Speech Act”:http://www.volpac.org/index.cfm?FuseAction=Blogs.View&Blog_id=210&BlogComment_id=13759 . While this should be obvious in our county, many people and groups have been attempting to get legislation that limits what you can say online. Bad idea! The internet, even beyond this now popular ‘blog thing’ is a great leveler in terms of letting people voice whatever harebrained opinions they have. Let it stay that way.

Service Downtime

Last night this box had a little bit of downtime with certain services. Chris had upgraded the router, and for some reason one of the policies didn’t take correctly, and began to deny UDP traffic to the nameservers. This proceeded in killing SMTP connections and a few other things that required lookups. He had quite a fun experience in fixing it last night, guess he had to drive in after the router began totally blocking everything when he tried fixing it. Not a fun experience.

Idiot Drivers

What is with the folks that think they can drive up the right turn lane to a red light, then jump the green to get through the light first, and get in front of traffic? That has happened a few times to me recently. So it get’s worse, when those people aren’t faster, and they give you all sorts of nasty stares, rude gestures and more because you aren’t making way for them.

Radio Zona

So I was listening to “Chunga and Mr.”:http://www.1019theend.com this morning, and they were doing the ‘Stupid News’ segment. The first thing they talked about was that there was a new radio station for prostitutes in Brasil, called Radio Zona (rádio zona). Chunga seemed to think a better name was “Ho Radio”. Good joke for Americans, but the original name is actually quite funny.

See, ‘uma zona’ in brasil is a slang term for a brothel or Red Light District. So the name really does fit.

Now, this of course is a tip for American LDS missionaries, who use the term Zone to refer to a geographical area in which several groups of missionaries work (usually comprised of a couple districts, which in turn are made up of a couple companionships of missionaries).

So when your new elder mentions that they will be going to a ‘Zone Meeting’ with their ‘Companion’ (the term for the other missionary you are assigned to work with), you get some interesting looks, and all sorts of confirmation to strange rumors about you.

What’s worse, the members of the church all realize what you really mean, so don’t bother to alert you to this, it is just slang after all.

Even worse, is a lot of the investigators are fine with this, until you start talking about the 4th discussion (which involves the law of Chastity).

LAMP Security

As reported in a few places, the “LAMP software stack was found to have less bugs than commercial offerings”:http://news.zdnet.com/2100-1009_22-6046475.html . It’s nice having some more support for the tools I love.

One of my favorite notes there, though, is the fact that even though the score for LAMP was lower than other tools, our average was raised by having PHP included in the stack.

_”There is one caveat: PHP, the popular programming language, is the only component in the LAMP stack that has a higher bug density than the baseline, Coverity said.”_

I think we’ve been saying that for a long time now.